healing herbs bach flower research programme

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healing herbs bach flower remedies

This chronology (by Philip Salmon and Anna Jeoffroy) sets out the milestones in the life of this remarkable man:
a research scientist of the highest calibre with a deep faith in God and Divine Providence.

Use the slider at the foot of this panel to move around the timeline.

 

Timeline 1880-1950

    1890 1900 1910 1920 1930    

1886

1887

1888

1889

1890

  1899

1900

1901

1902

1903

1904

1905

1906

1907

1908

1909

1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

 

 
 

Edward Bach born in Birmingham

             

Joins Worcester
Yeomanry

Enters Birmingham University
to study medicine

     

Qualifies
as doctor

 

Applies for
overseas
service

In charge of war beds
at University
College Hospital
Gwendoline Bach dies
5 April
Influenza
epidemic
  Publications

Masonic
Moves to
Park
Crescent
Effects of diet on disease
Chronic Disease
  Publication
Publication
Gives up nosode therapy
Publi-
cations
Heal Thyself
Free Thyself
Masonic
Moves to Sotwell
'Second
Nineteen'
remedies
Further threat from GMC
New edition of 12 Healers
To Thine Own Self Be True
  Nora Weeks' biography
Story continues on
Bach Centre timeline
                Works in father's
brass foundry
              Marries
Gwendoline Caiger

 

Daughter born to Kitty Light Marries Kitty Light 2 May
Joins freemasons
Homoeopathic appointment and research
 
Separates from Kitty
 

Masonic

Masonic

Masonic

  First three remedies
Publication
Moves to Wales
Two further remedies
Discovers last of
the '12 Healers'
  First lecture on
herbal remedies
       
                                      Appointments and further qualifications
    July: illness
                Masonic
dinner
Further six
remedies
Dispute with
GMC
  Publishes
The Twelve Healers
       
  From the 1881 census
             

 

             

 

                        Locations
  Cromer slideshow
Locations
  Locations
  Masonic help
       
                                                                Locations
        Death of Dr Bach
       
                          S Africa       USA               Europe     USA       USSR   UK     USA   USA / Europe      

 

Europe      
              Boer War       San Francisco earthquake          

 

World War 1   Prohibition       Stalin   General Strike   Wall St Crash   The Depression      
World War 2      
                                                 
   
1936

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Final illness
 

The strain of a lifetime of work now began to take its toll. For the second time in his life Bach now became very seriously ill.

He died during the evening of 27 November 1936.

See death certificate.

 
1936

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Twelve Healers
 

Bach published 'The Twelve Healers and Other Remedies'.

The 38 remedies were placed under the following seven headings

1  For Fear
2  For Uncertainty
3  For Insufficient Interest in Present Circumstances
4  For Loneliness
5  For Those Over-sensitive to Influences and Ideas
6  For Despondency or Despair
7  For Over-Care for Welfare of Others

 
1936

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Final public talk

In October 1936 his last public talk was given to a Masonic gathering. The theme of the talk was ‘Disease is Curable’.

 
 

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Dr Bach's membership of the freemasons
 
1918 Initiated in the London Warwickshire Lodge, Number 3846 (Mother Lodge) on 25 November.
1920

Joins the Royal Hampton Court Lodge, Number 2183 on 20 February.
Joins the Norbury Lodge, Number 4046 on 6 October. (Dr Bach's father, Walter Best Bach, was initiated in St Pauls Lodge, Number 43, Birmingham, on 25 October 1920. He resigned from the lodge on 24 November 1930.)

1924 Senior Deacon, London Warwickshire Lodge
1925 Senior Warden, London Warwickshire Lodge, until 1927
1926 Worshipful Master, Royal Hampton Court Lodge
1928 Master, Norbury Lodge, until 1929
1928 Master, London Warwickshire Lodge (30 April)
1929 Installs successor, London Warwickshire Lodge (29 April)
1933 Honorary Member, Norbury Lodge
1933 May; excluded for three years from London Wawickshire Lodge for non-payment of fees.
1936 Granted ten guineas from the Norbury Lodge Benevolent Fund (5 February)
 
 

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Dr Bach's movements
 
1919 Nottingham Place, London W1 - laboratories.
1920 Park Cresent, London
1928 Abergavenny and Crickhowell to find the first flower remedies
1930 Bettws-y-Coed, Wales (developed type theory)
Abersoch Wales (there he wrote Heal Thyself)
Pwllheli, Wales
Cromer, Norfolk - August/September
1931 Abergavenny, Monmouthshire
Lewes, Sussex where he found Water Violet
June July in Thames Valley (? Marlow)
Westerham in Kent - made gentian
1932 Consulting rooms in Wimpole Street Wrote Free Thyself in Regents Park. Spent winter in Cromer.
1933 April in Marlow, Bucks
Cromer in May
August Abergavenny
 
1936

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Wallingford lecture
 

September 24th, his 50th birthday, he gives the first public lecture on ‘Healing by Herbs’ in the Masonic Hall, Wallingford.

 
1940

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Biography

'The Medical Discoveries of Edward Bach Physician'.
Nora Week's biography of Dr Bach.

 
1938

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Publication

'To Thine Own Self be True' by Mary Tabor

 
1936

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Further threat from GMC

In January he received a letter from The General Medical Council threatening to have him struck off the Medical Register if he continues to use ‘unqualified assistants’. He was by now working with a small team of assistants.

 
1935

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The Second Nineteen

In February/March he began a new cycle of remedies which were prepared by the boiling method.

They are Cherry Plum, Aspen, Elm, Chestnut Bud, Larch, Beech, Hornbeam, Walnut, Star of Bethlehem, Holly, Crab Apple, Willow, Pine, Red Chestnut, Mustard, Wild Rose, Honeysuckle and Sweet Chestnut. White Chestnut, which he found in May, is the only one of this group of the Second Nineteen to be made by the sun method.

 
1934

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Moves to Sotwell
 

In April he moved to the village of Sotwell near Wallingford in what was then Berkshire, to a house called Mount Vernon. In June he found Wild Oat near Sotwell.

Wrote 'The Twelve Healers and Seven Helpers', published in July.
'The Story of the Travellers' - the natures of 16 remedies explained in a short children's story format.

 
1933

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Helper remedues discovered
 

The four helper remedies found: Oak in Cromer, Norfolk; Gorse, in the Thames Valley and Rock Water and Heather found near Crickhowell in Wales [above]

Friends in Switzerland sent him Vine and friends from Italy sent Olive and Vine, prepared by the sun method from his instructions.

 
1933

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Publications

Twelve Great Remedies published in a magazine for Homeopaths.

His book The Twelve Healers and Four Helpers published in the autumn.

 
1932

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Dispute with GMC
 

During the latter part of 1932 and into 1933 Bach was in correspondence with the General Medical Council [the body with the legal responsibility for regulating the medical profession in the UK] who threatened to strike him off the Medical Register for advertising his remedies in local newspapers.

This example appeared in the Northern Daily Telegraph of 24 Nov 32.

 
Thanks to Blackburn with Darwen Library and Information Service for above illustration.
1932

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Final Twelve Healer remedy discovered

He returned to Westerham, where he had found Gentian the previous year, this time to find Rock Rose, the last in the series which he called 'The Twelve Healers', later to become 'The Twelve Healers and Other Remedies'.

 
1932

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Publication

'Free Thyself' published.

 
1931

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Further remedy discoveries

In June at Lewes in Sussex, Bach found Water Violet and in July near Westerham in Kent he found Gentian.

He now had 11 of his 12 Healers series but as it was late in the year he would have to wait until the following spring to find the last one.

 
1931

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Publications
 

February: 'Ye Suffer From Yourselves', an address given in Southport.

Published 'Heal Thyself - An Explanation of the Real Cause and Cure of Disease'.

 
1930

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Moves to Wales
 

Early in the year Bach left London and moved to a small Welsh village near Bettws-y-coed to continue his work on his group theory and search for new remedies.

Visits Abersoch, a small seaside village a few miles from Pwllheli in North Wales where he stayed until the end of July. It was here that he perfected the sun method of extracting the healing properties of plants and where he wrote 'Heal Thyself'.

 
1930

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Publications

January: 'An Effective Method of Preparing Vaccines for Oral Administration' published in Medical World.

February: 'Some New Remedies and New Uses' published in Homoeopathic World.

'Some Fundamental Considerations of Disease and Cure' published in Homoeopathic World.

 
1930

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Six further discoveries
 

In August while in Cromer he discovered Agrimony, Centaury, Chicory, Cerato and Vervain. In September discovered Scleranthus.

 
1930

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Cromer

In 1930 Dr Bach began what was to become a four-year association with the small town of Cromer, in the east-coast county of Norfolk.
We have a photographic archive of the town, made in 2002, although the views depicted will hardly have changed since Bach's time there.

Modem
connection

Broadband
connection

 
1929

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Turns from conventional medicine

Bach was dissatisfied with using the products of disease to cure disease and gave up nosode therapy.

‘I wish it were possible that we could present to you seven herbs instead of seven groups of bacteria.’ He finally found the solution to his dilemma: ‘yet there is one thing lacking in the effort to avoid using bacterial nosodes, this vital point is polarity. The remedies of the meadow and nature, when potentized are of a positive polarity; whereas those which have been associated with disease are of the reverse type… Science is tending to show that life is harmony - a state of being in tune - and that disease is discord or a condition when a part of the whole is not vibrating in unison’.

From the end of 1929 he gave up all methods of treatment except ‘the pure and simple herbs of the field’.

He eventually found that there were 12 groups or predominant states of mind. These he related to the types of karmic lessons people need to work through in life.

 
1929

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Publication

The Rediscovery of Psora, published in The British Homoeopathic Journal.

 
1928

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Publication

In March The Medical World published 'An Effective Method of
Combating Intestinal Toxaemia'.

 
1928

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A masonic dinner, reported by Nora Weeks

‘Bach had attended the dinner somewhat unwillingly and was not enjoying himself greatly. To pass the time he was idly watching the people around him when suddenly he realised that the whole of humanity consisted of a number of definite groups of types; that every individual in that large hall belonged to one or other of these groups. . .

‘He found this a most engrossing occupation, and by the time the dinner was over he had worked out a number of groups and was busy in his mind comparing these with the seven bacterial groups.

‘He wondered how this extended group-theory would apply to disease and its cure - whether the diseases from which these groups suffered would also bear a resemblance to each other.

‘Then came the inspiration that the individuals of each group would not suffer from the same kinds of disease, but that all of those in any group would react in the same or nearly the same manner to any type of illness.’
From 'The Medical Discoveries of Edward Bach Physician' by Nora Weeks

 
1928

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First discovery of remedies

In September, following an intuitive impulse, he went to Wales where he found the first three of the flower remedies at Crickhowell: Impatiens, Mimulus, and Clematis.

In November, in an address to The British Homoeopathic Society he referred to the fact that certain plants resembled the bacterial nosodes in their action.

 
1927

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Publication

At the International Homoeopathic Congress held in London, Dr Bach read a paper entitled 'The Problem of Chronic Disease' with Drs CE Wheeler and TM Dishington.

 
1925

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Publication
 

Published 'Chronic Disease: A Working Hypothesis', written with Dr CE Wheeler who had assisted him in his research at the London Homoeopathic Hospital.

 
1928

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Publication

In March The Medical World published 'An Effective Method of
Combating Intestinal Toxaemia'.

 
1924

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Studying diet and disease

Dr Bach advised eating more uncooked food, fruits, nuts, cereals and vegetables to reduce the amount of toxins produced in the intestines.

At the British Homoeopathic Congress in London he read a paper entitled 'Intestinal Toxaemia in its Relation to Cancer', discussing the effects of diet combined with vaccine treatment.

He observed that ‘the benefit obtained is due to general improvement and not local treatment’.

 
1922

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New consulting rooms
 

Bach gave up his post at the London Homoeopathic Hospital and moved to a large laboratory in Park Crescent [above], off Portland Place. He kept his Harley Street consulting room where his practice continued to prosper.

 
1920

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Publications

'The Relation of Vaccine Therapy to Homoeopathy'
The British Homoeopathic Journal, April 1920.
Bach also read this as a paper to the London Homoeopathic Society in April 1920

Other publications in 1920:

'The Nature of Serum Antitrypsin and its Relation to Autolysis and the Formation of Toxins'
FH Teale and E Bach, The Proceedings of The Royal Society of Medicine, 1920.

'The Relation of Autotryptic Titre of Blood to Bacteria Infection and Anaphylaxis '
FH Teale and E Bach, The Proceedings of The Royal Society of Medicine, 1920.

'The fate of ‘washed spores’ on inoculation into animals, with special reference to the Nature of Bacterial Toxaemia' by
FH Teal and E Bach, Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology, 1920.

 
1919

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Begins research into vaccines
 

In March 1919 Bach was appointed Pathologist and Bacteriologist at the London Homoeopathic Hospital. [picture shows the Pathology Laboratory a few years earlier]

Here he works on researching the organisms present in the intestines, classifying them into seven groups, by means of their fermentation action on sugar.

The seven groups of bacilli he named were:
1 Proteus
2 Dysentery
3 Morgan
4 Faecalis Alkaligenes
5 Coil Mutabile
6 Gaertner
7 No.7

Vaccines prepared from these groups were found to purify the intestinal tract.

Each patient was tested for the bacterial group predominant in the intestines and either an autogenous or polyvalent nosode given. In the autogenous method a remedy was made of the organism isolated from a particular patient and given either by injection or by mouth. To cover a great number of cases a polyvalent nosode, made from collecting organisms from hundreds of patients then potentizing the whole, was administered.

 
1917

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Illness

In July Bach collapsed with severe haemorrhage. Received surgery for cancer and was given three months to live.

However he recovered and continued with his research work.

 
1917

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Second marriage
 

Bach was living at 42 Canonbury Square

On 2 May he married Kitty Emmeline Jane Light, then living at 89 Calabria Rd, Islington, about half a mile distant. marriage certificate.

 
Photo: Rachel Carter
1918

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Influenza pandemic of 1918
 

In the spring of 1918 a flu epidemic broke out in the trenches among the soldiers fighting the war. By May it had spread back to the home countries of the soldiers, England, Germany, the USA and India. In England it quickly spread to become a very serious outbreak, claiming 228,000 lives (and in India, according to some estimates, many millions).

Desperate measures to prevent the spread: streets were sprayed and people wore masks. However both the precautions and the treatments were ineffectual.

Dr Bach would have been working at university College Hospital during this terrible epidemic.

 
1915

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FIrst World War
 

In 1915 Dr Bach was in charge of war beds at University College Hospital. [image is contemporaneous but not of UCH]

At the same time, as well as researching into vaccine therapy at the Bacteriological Department he was also a demonstrator and clinical assistant to the Hospital Medical School.

 
1914

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Further qualification

Awarded the Diploma in Public Health Camb. (Cambridge).

At the outbreak of the First World War, Bach applied to serve abroad. To his sorrow he was on several occasions refused permission on health grounds.

 
1913

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Further qualifications and early appointments
 
Awarded the degrees MB (Medicinae Baccalaureus, Bachelor of Medicine) and BS (Bachelor of Science).

Appointed Casualty Medical Officer at University College Hospital (the famous cruciform building shown above - now a medical school - had opened in 1906).

Appointed Casualty House Surgeon at the National Temperance Hospital. He was forced to give up this post after a few months due to ill health brought on by overwork.

When he recovered he took consulting rooms near Harley Street.

 
1913

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Marriage
 
On 14 January at the Parish Church of Hendon in Middlesex, Edward Bach marries Gewndoline Caiger. See marriage certificate.
 
1912

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Qualifies as doctor
Bach had moved from Birmingham University to London to complete his medical training. From University College Hospital he obtained the Conjunct Diploma of MRCS (Member of the Royal College of Surgeons) and LRCP (Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians).
 
1903

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Joins Worcester Yeomanry
At the age of 16, Bach joins this miltary regiment, which had recently returned from South Africa where it had taken part in the action against The Boers, descendants of the original Dutch settlers in the Transvaal and Orange Free States, whose ambitions in the rich region clashed with the British. Lacking sufficient cavalry to match the versatile and mobile Boers, the British had been forced to send the 'Yeomanry', part-time volunteer soldiers, among them some from Bach's local regiment, the Worcesters.

More
 
 
1903

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Brass founding
Birmingham had been a centre for brass founding since the early 18th century. Indeed in a city renowned for all types of metal-working, including iron, gold, silver and gilt, brass-working was pre-eminent.
 
1886                                                                                     close
Edward Bach born 1886
Edward Bach was the eldest of three children, two boys and a girl.

Moseley, now a suburb of Birmingham, was at that time a village, situated about three miles outside the city.
Picture shows Moseley village in 1900. Courtesy Birmingham Public Libraries
1881

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From the census of 1881
Walter Bach (Dr Bach’s father) at the time of the census was 25 years old and unmarried, living at The Hollies, Alcester Road, Moseley, Kings Norton, Worcestershire. In residence were his widowed father (Dr Bach’s grandfather), two step sisters, two nephews, three visitors and two domestic servants. Walter Bach was a brass founder, born in Birmingham. Walter’s father, also named Edward Bach, was described as a spur maker (saddler) born in Hopsey, Shropshire in 1810.